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RCORP 2020: Addressing the Opioid Crisis Through Sustainable Community Action RSV


Marriott Marquis Washington, DC 

March 4–6, 2020


Agenda


Tuesday, March 3, 2020

6:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.

Registration and Information

Eastern Market Room – M3 Level


Day 1—Wednesday, March 4, 2020

8:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Registration and Information

Independence Foyer

9:00 a.m.–9:15 a.m.

Opening and Welcome

Independence Ballroom

Federal Office of Rural Health Policy (FORHP)

9:15 a.m.–10:30 a.m.

Many Pathways of Recovery

Independence Ballroom

There are many pathways of recovery and all are cause for celebration. This session will feature five brief sketches of hope from people who are thriving in recovery. None of them initiated or sustained their recovery in the same way, but they are all valued resources to their families and communities.

Donald McDonald, M.S.W., RCP, JBS International, Inc.

Julie Flood, SMART Recovery

Steven Samra, M.P.A., C4 Innovations

Patty McCarthy, M.S., Faces & Voices of Recovery

David Washington, M.S.W., B.S.W, LCADC, LCSW-C

10:30 a.m.–10:45 a.m.

Break

10:45 a.m.–12:00 p.m.

Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT): Efficacy and Application

Independence Ballroom

John Brooklyn, M.D., University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine

Nikki King, M.B.A., M.H.A., Margaret Mary Health

Lindsey Gessendorf, M.S.W., LCSW, Margaret Mary Health

Shannon Schmaltz, M.S., B.S., Ripley County Court Services

12:00 p.m.–1:30 p.m.

Lunch (On Your Own)

1:00 p.m.–2:10 p.m.

Grantee Showcase/Resources Fair

Liberty Ballroom

Presenters will answer questions about their posters and projects that address the opioid epidemic in their communities. Several organizations will be available to answer questions about the resources they have available to assist grantees in their work.

2:10 p.m.–2:40 p.m.

Keynote

Independence Ballroom

Diana Espinosa, M.P.P., Deputy Administrator, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Eric D. Hargan, J.D., Deputy Secretary, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

2:40 p.m.–2:45 p.m.

Break

2:45 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Breakout Sessions


Federal SUD/OUD Resources and Funding Opportunities in Support of Rural Communities

Capitol Room

The federal government has developed and implemented a multiagency response to the national opioid epidemic that has the nation experiencing more than 130 opioid-related deaths a day. Specific to the rural opioid epidemic, multiple federal agencies have invested significant resources in health and infrastructure programs in support of rural communities’ efforts to address substance use disorders (SUDs) and, specifically, opioid use disorder (OUD) at a local level. This Federal Resources session will provide attendees with specific information on the numerous federal programs that target rural communities and tribes directly or through the support of state programs, policies, and resources encompassing prevention, treatment, and recovery, and enhancing workforce and community-based transportation.

Betty-Ann Bryce, J.D., M.P.A., U.S. Department of Agriculture; Israil Ali, M.P.A, HRSA Meghan Stringer, B.A., Office of the Assistant Secretary for Policy, U.S. Department of Labor; Danielle Nelson, M.P.H., U.S. Department of Transportation


Recovery Housing

Judiciary Square Room

This session describes the Rural Center of Excellence (RCOE) for Recovery Housing and activities to promote quality and capacity for recovery housing. It provides an overview of the principles of structure, operations, funding, and outcomes in establishing recovery housing within a “recovery ecosystem.” The presentation will outline the RCOE’s activities to support states, communities, and operators in establishing a recovery housing infrastructure that reflects best practices.

Dave Johnson, M.S.W., ACSW, Fletcher Group, Inc.



Preventing Onset of Use: Who, What, Where, When, and How?

Independence Ballroom

Join us for a brief primer regarding the basics of primary prevention, followed by an illuminating trip through three RCORP grantee communities skillfully implementing strategies to prevent the onset of substance use. Grantees from Georgia, Missouri, and Texas will share their experiences partnering with schools, faith-based organizations, and the community at large to effectively increase protective factors and decrease risk factors related to substance use.

Elisha Figueroa, M.S.W., CPS, LMSW, JBS International, Inc.; Angie Jones, M.S.S.W., JBS International, Inc.; Jenny Armbruster, M.Ed., B.A., LPC, National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse; Derek Jones, M.Ed., B.Sc., Southeast Health District; Cara Taylor, M.S.N., RN, Jeff Davis County Health Department; Sheryl Lewis, M.B.A., Jeff Davis Board of Health; Becky Vance, Drug Prevention Resources, Inc.; Beth Wilson, Drug Prevention Resources, Inc.


Navigating Systems for Impacted Families: Advocacy, Empowerment, and Resources

Supreme Court Room

This session will discuss the critical importance and varied ways of supporting families as they navigate through systems of care, supervision, and control. The session will focus on: (1) the critical importance of access to legal services for advocacy and problem solving related to custody, assistance with guardianship/kinship care, and conflict resolution; (2) the importance of understanding the impact of traumatic stress among children, how interventions that serve families should address trauma, and traumatic stress, and the ways trauma reactions seen as behavioral outbursts often impact access to services via discharge or denial of services; (3) point-of-care access and the need to partner with providers we don’t traditionally think of when dealing with SUD—pediatricians, for example. Presenters will also discuss helping families navigate systems by shifting culture, policies, stigma, and services, which they are doing intentionally, strategically, and thoroughly, particularly with regard to pregnant and early parenting women with OUD.

Helen Gratil, J.D., Legal Aid of Arkansas; Kay Connors, M.S.W., LCSW-C, Taghi Modarressi Center for Infant Study, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine; Jessica Hulsey Nickel, B.A., Addiction Policy Forum; Mandy Fauble, Ph.D., M.S.W., LCSW, Safe Harbor Behavioral Health of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Hamot



Peer and Other Paraprofessional Services: Recruitment, Hiring, Training, and Support

Treasury Room

This session will cover strategies to develop a strong foundation for recruiting, training, sustaining, and supervising a peer/paraprofessional workforce. It will highlight the significant contribution peers have made to the behavioral healthcare system, followed by the successful integration of Community Health Workers in a rural community to help meet the needs of its residents. Additionally, handouts and tools will be shared to provide practical information for integrating peers into a team or organization.

Caroline Beidler, M.S.W., B.A., CASAC, Creative Consultation Services, LLC; Steven Samra, M.P.A., C4 Innovations; Erik Schoen, M.A., LCPC, Community Chest, Inc.



“Outside the Walls”: Diversion Programs and Other Public Safety Partnerships

Mt. Vernon Square Room

Participants will learn about various diversion programs and other public safety partnerships working to decrease overdose and connect people to prevention, harm reduction, treatment, and recovery programs. The session will present lessons learned from the field, including: a closer look at successful collaborations and partnerships, challenges such as pushback by some drug courts to MAT, being creative, sustaining programs, and implementing programs that are evidenced based. Presenters will also discuss the benefits of using Law Enforcement-Assisted Diversion (LEAD), an evidence-based pre-arrest diversion model that uses a harm reduction approach. Recognizing the importance of connecting people to care, this session will also discuss effective utilization of Quick Response Teams (QRTs), which are groups of interprofessional providers who follow up within days with people who have overdosed, connecting these high-risk overdose survivors to essential services.

Susan James-Andrews, M.S., B.S., CAC, James-Andrews & Associates; Donnie Varnell, B.S., Dare County Sheriff's Office; Jennifer Lanzillotta-Rangeley, Ph.D., CRNA, University of Cincinnati; Tasha Turner-Bicknell, M.S.N., B.A., B.S.N., DNP, RN, University of Cincinnati


Lowering the Bar to MAT Entry and Improving Retention

Monument Room

Attendees at this training will be exposed to the structure and function of a MAT clinic that functions from a harm reduction perspective. The discussion will focus on lessons learned from a 3-year implementation project as well as ways to ensure sustainability beyond grant funding.

Robert Lyle Cooper, Ph.D., Meharry Medical College Department of Family and Community Medicine



Community Stigma and Cultural Humility

Archives Room

This discussion-based panel will look at the nature and impact of stigma; successful efforts to address stigma; and ways that stigma, culture, and substance use are bound together. The panel will include (1) researchers whose fieldwork demonstrates the pervasive impact of stigma, (2) practitioners who have worked to build infrastructure and move communities away from stigmatizing perspectives, and (3) a grantee with insight into the importance of culturally appropriate care and the promise of culturally centered approaches.

Lisa Sockabasin, Wabanaki Public Health; Robert Zellner, CPRS, RPS, Awakenings Recovery Center; Andrea López, Ph.D., University of Maryland; Danielle German, Ph.D., M.P.H., Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Marie Stratton, Maryland Department of Health

4:00 p.m.—4:15 p.m.

Break

4:15 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Breakout Sessions


Federal SUD/OUD Resources and Funding Opportunities in Support of Rural Communities

Supreme Court Room

The federal government has developed and implemented a multiagency response to the national opioid epidemic which has the nation experiencing more than 130 opioid-related deaths a day. Specific to the rural opioid epidemic, multiple federal agencies have invested significant resources in health and infrastructure programs in support of rural communities’ efforts to address the opioid crisis at a local level. This Federal Resources session will provide attendees with specific information on the numerous federal programs that target rural communities and tribes directly or through the support of state programs, policies, and resources encompassing prevention, treatment, recovery, engaging law enforcement and corrections, and enhancing workforce.

Betty-Ann Bryce, J.D., M.P.A., U.S. Department of Agriculture; Meghan Stringer, B.A., Office of the Assistant Secretary for Policy, U.S. Department of Labor; Tara Kunkel, M.S.W., Bureau of Justice Assistance; Andrew Howard, B.S., Appalachian Regional Commission


Recovery Housing

Judiciary Square Room

This session describes the Rural Center of Excellence (RCOE) for Recovery Housing and activities to promote quality and capacity for recovery housing. It provides an overview of the principles of structure, operations, funding, and outcomes in establishing recovery housing within a “recovery ecosystem.” The presentation will outline the RCOE’s activities to support states, communities, and operators in establishing a recovery housing infrastructure that reflects best practices.

Dave Johnson, M.S.W., ACSW, Fletcher Group, Inc.


Gaining Prevention Buy-in From Medical Providers, Law Enforcement, EMS, and Fire

Treasury Room

In this session, attendees will learn how to engage medical professionals, law enforcement, fire personnel, and emergency medical services (EMS) in overdose prevention initiatives centered around prevention, harm reduction, treatment, and recovery. Presenters will discuss getting buy-in from (1) providers, to obtain and use their x-waivers, and (2) law enforcement, to engage in harm reduction—and how to engage them in general. This session will also detail how nine peer support specialists changed the perspective of a career firefighter and prompted her to become a better advocate for those with an SUD and those in crisis.

Jennifer Yturriondobeitia, D.B.H., M.S.W., Cornerstone Whole Healthcare Organization, Inc.; Allison Hephner, B.S., Summit Healthcare Association; Donnie Varnell, B.S., Dare County Sheriff's Office



ACEs, Opioids, & Trauma-Informed Care: Connecting the Dots

Archives Room

Participants will be guided through a deeper dive into the biology of stress and the impact of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) on the opioid crisis and “diseases of despair.” Presenters will highlight evidence-based programs and approaches to prevention, harm reduction, and mitigating the harmful stigma surrounding individuals with SUDs.

Robert Zellner, CPRS, RPS, Awakenings Recovery Center; Kay Connors, M.S.W., LCSW-C, Taghi Modarressi Center for Infant Study, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine; Marie Stratton, Maryland Department of Health



Peer Workforce: Sustainability, Retention, and Reimbursement

Independence Ballroom

The session will first address the challenges in implementing a peer workforce in rural Nevada and efforts to sustain this workforce through participation in the Rural Nevada Health Network and Medicaid. The session will focus on how to sustain and retain the peer workforce, providing a case study of ED2Recovery and a description of how localized support through the recovery community organization model increases peer workforce capacity. Presenters will also address quality peer supervision, engaging new and diverse stakeholders, and encouraging peer participation at all levels of sustainability efforts and planning. They will also present an overview of the latest collection of peer support rates across states collected by the National Academy for State Health Policy.

Erik Schoen, M.A., LCPC, Community Chest, Inc.; Caroline Beidler, M.S.W., B.A., CASAC, Creative Consultation Services, LLC; Kitty Purington, J.D., The National Academy for State Health Policy



“Inside the Walls”: Prevention, Treatment, and Recovery in Correctional Settings

Mt. Vernon Square Room

Participants will learn why it’s important to provide services in holding facilities, local jails, and prisons; listen to and interact with organizations and leaders in the field who will share insights about strategies for gaining access to these places and what worked once they were in; and learn about MAT in correctional settings and qualitative interviewing in local jails, among other related topics.

Sharon Morello, B.S.N., RN, JBS International, Inc.; Tracy Crossman, CCAR, Healthy Acadia; Caroline Bloss, M.S.S.W., LSW, Healthy Acadia; KaLeigh Underwood, M.A, St. Claire HealthCare; David Gross, M.P.A., St. Claire HealthCare


Non-Federal Resources: A World of Opportunity

Capitol Room

Attendees will learn about available resources from multiple national organizations that can support efforts of grantees and communities seeking to positively impact opioid and other substance use risks in the community.

Patty McCarthy, M.S., Faces & Voices of Recovery; Kenneth Shatzkes, Ph.D., Foundation for Opioid Response Efforts; Jessica Hulsey Nickel, B.A., Addiction Policy Forum; General Arthur Dean, M.A., Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America; Robin Phillips, J.D., B.A., National Rural Transit Assistance Program



Know Your Epidemic: How Prescribing, Fentanyl, and Meth Drive Overdose Death

Monument Room

Attendees will leave this session with a better understanding of the dynamics between the three waves of the opioid crisis and a fuller appreciation of how meth and stimulants are constituting the fourth wave. They will hear this from a leading researcher in the field and from a 30,000-feet view, complemented by a description of how this trend has manifested in particular communities, based on ethnographic research that consists of qualitative interviews with people who use drugs.

Jon Zibbell, Ph.D., M.A, RTI International; Danielle German, Ph.D., M.P.H., Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

5:30 p.m.

End of Day 1

Day 2—Thursday, March 5, 2020

8:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

Registration and Information

Independence Foyer

9:00 a.m.–9:30 a.m.

Welcome and Federal Office of Rural Health Policy (FORHP) Update

Independence Ballroom

Michael McNeely, M.B.A., M.P.H., CPHIMS

Megan Meacham, M.P.H., FORHP

9:30 a.m.–10:00 a.m.

Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA) Grants

Independence Ballroom

William Davis, J.D., HRSA

10:00 a.m.–10:15 a.m.

Break

10:15 a.m.–11:45 a.m.

Grantee Cohort Sessions


Rural Communities Opioid Response Program–Implementation (RCORP-I)

Archives Room

This session is a required program meeting for RCORP-I grantees.



Rural Communities Opioid Response Program–MAT Expansion (RCORP-MAT Expansion)

Supreme Court Room

This session is a required program meeting for RCORP-MAT Expansion grantees.



Rural Communities Opioid Response Program–Planning II (RCORP-P II)

Independence Ballroom

This session is a required program meeting for RCORP-P II grantees.



Rural Health Opioid Program (RHOP)

Monument Room

This session is a required program meeting for RHOP grantees.



RCORP Rural Centers of Excellence (RCOE)

Mint Room

This session is a required program meeting for RCOE grantees.

11:45 a.m.–1:15 p.m.

Lunch (On Your Own)

1:15 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.

Special Sessions (Optional)


Meth Focus Group

Independence Ballroom

Participants will share, in a town hall style, what trends in methamphetamine misuse their communities are experiencing, how their communities are addressing the issue, and what resources (federal, state, local, etc.) are needed to make a dent in it.



Tribal/American Indian/Alaska Native Affinity Group

Supreme Court Room

The session will provide an opportunity for networking and sharing of best practices among grantees who are tribal entities or serving a large tribal/American Indian/Alaska Native population.


Quality Improvement "Super Users" Affinity Group

Monument Room

Participants will have the opportunity to network, share experiences, and discuss best practices around using quality improvement (QI) in the context of OUD/SUD. QI subject matter expert Dr. Angela Carman, from the University of Kentucky, will be present to offer technical assistance.



Telehealth/Telemedicine/Project ECHO Affinity Group

Archives Room

This group will provide grantees an opportunity to network and share best practices related to the use of telehealth, telemedicine, and Project ECHO.



Emergency Responders Affinity Group

Capitol Room

The session will provide an opportunity for networking and sharing of best practices among grantees who are first responders or who are working with first responders as an integral part of their projects.

2:15 p.m.–2:30 p.m.

Break

2:30 p.m.–3:45 p.m.

Breakout Sessions


Best Practices: Care of Pregnant Women With OUD and Their Newborns

Mint Room

This session will provide participants an overview of best practices through the stages of caring for women with OUD and their newborns: family planning, pregnancy and prenatal, delivery, and the postpartum year. Participants will hear of a recent peer support “Recovery Doula” program, designed specifically for mom and baby through pregnancy and the postpartum year.

Mark Depman, M.D, Central Vermont Medical Center, University of Vermont Health Network; Ella Thorne-Thomse, CRC, Turning Point of Windham County



Engagement, Retention, and Care Planning for Persons Using Multiple Substances

Supreme Court Room

This session will present strategies for engaging and treating individuals with OUD who use multiple substances. The session will address how polysubstance use has become the norm in treatment, offer strategies for engaging patients at various stages of readiness to change, and discuss how to address risk and harm reduction and foster engagement with patients who may not be ready to seek treatment and recovery supporting successful treatment outcomes.

Win Turner, Ph.D., LADC, Center for Behavioral Health Integration


Updates on Federal and State Health Policy To Support Rural Communities

Archives Room

This session will explore existing and emerging federal and state health policies that affect rural communities and grantees. As grantees are exploring sustainability for SUD treatment access, navigating the health policy landscape to leverage funding mechanisms is a critical component. Speakers will provide updates on both Medicare and Medicaid policies that impact reimbursement for treatment. In addition to the new federal policy regarding opioid treatment programs and Medicare reimbursement from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the session will include information on successful state Medicaid SUD treatment models in rural clinical settings. Further, this session will include a review of a new behavioral health workforce policy website developed by the National Conference of State Legislatures in conjunction with HRSA that offers state-specific treatment workforce information that supports both policymakers and grantees as they address capacity needs.

Jodi Manz, M.S.W., The National Academy for State Health Policy; Lindsey Baldwin, M.S., B.A., LCPC, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services; Sydne Enlund, B.A., National Conference of State Legislatures



Employing Persons in Recovery: Peer Engagement, Employer Perspectives, and the Importance of Community Collaboration in Peer Employment

Monument Room

This session will cover the employment of peers covering pathways of professional growth, recovery café hiring, and partnerships to connect people in recovery to employment. All presenters will speak from their experiences, including successes and lessons learned.

Loren Collura, B.A., Hope & Coffee; Robert Zellner, CPRS, RPS, Awakenings Recovery Center; Mary Beth Leone, M.S.W., CADC, LCSW, Penobscot Community Health Care



Empowerment Choice and Voice: Imperatives, Opportunities, and Obstacles to Engaging PWUD in Shaping the Programs Meant To Serve Them

Treasury Room

This session will look at how the principles of trauma-informed care require a true partnership between service providers and those served and the specific challenges related to people who use drugs (PWUD). The session will also address the challenge of and recommendations for implementing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendation that our response to overdose follows the principle “Nothing About Us Without Us.”

Dave Didden, M.D., Jefferson County Community Ministries; Shannon Hicks, CPSS, Exchange Union; Jess Tilley, B.A., HRH413; Andrea López, Ph.D., University of Maryland



The Social Determinants of Health: Preventing Substance Use and Overdose

Independence Ballroom

Participants will learn how social determinants of health impact overdose as well as prevention, harm reduction, treatment, and recovery initiatives. Presenters will discuss how the social determinants of health vary by community and the impact of these factors in bridging gaps and forming a healthy environment. They will outline the social factors that decrease access to health care for people who use drugs in Southern Appalachia and describe how harm reduction services can uniquely meet the needs of people who do not have access to other forms of care. They will discuss how law enforcement working with harm reduction groups can impact the social determinants of health. Because people affected by OUD and SUD are less likely to maintain sobriety and more likely to continue to misuse substances when they receive OUD and SUD services in isolation, presenters will also focus on addressing the social determinants of health when working with these individuals and discuss how addressing these barriers positively impacts the rate of recovery.

Melissa Clark, B.S., Area Health Education Center West; Lesly-Marie Buer, Ph.D., M.P.H., Positively Living/Choice Health Network Harm Reduction; Donnie Varnell, B.S., Dare County Sheriff's Office; Robert Childs, M.P.H., JBS International, Inc.; Ann McCauley, Randolph County Caring Community Partnership; Patty Hendren, Randolph County Caring Community; Jayme Palmgren, B.A., CHW, Randolph County Caring

Community, Inc.


How Whole Family Care Can Bolster Your Community’s Response to the Opioid Crisis

Mt. Vernon Square Room

In this interactive session, a panel of experts from three distinct regions of the U.S. (West, Northeast, and South) will share their diverse approaches to and experiences with delivering whole family care in their respective communities. Panelists will offer in-depth discussions of innovative strategies for addressing the needs of the entire family, including the policies, resources, and practices that can be put in place to develop and sustain a family-centered framework for use in any setting.

Kyle Perkins, M.B.A., B.S., Horizon Health; Bacall Hincks, M.S.W., LCSW, Children’s Service Society of Utah; Kay Connors, M.S.W., LCSW-C, Taghi Modarressi Center for Infant Study, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine; Kari Earle, M.Ed., B.S., JBS International, Inc.



The Intersection of Prevention, Treatment, and Recovery

Capitol Room

Substance use services exist in three distinct sectors: prevention, treatment, and recovery. Because each has its own history, language, theoretical foundation, workforce, and funding, siloing is not uncommon. As we respond to the overdose crisis, it has never been more important for these groups to work together. This session will explore the differences that divide them and the common goals they share. Attendees will discuss specific ways in which these sectors can connect with and support one another.

Angie Jones, M.S.S.W., JBS International, Inc.; Donald McDonald, M.S.W., RCP, JBS International, Inc.; Joe Hyde, M.A., CAS, LMHC, JBS International, Inc.

3:45 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Break

4:00 p.m.–5:15 p.m.

Recruitment, Retention, and Training for the Substance Use Disorder Workforce in Rural Communities

Independence Ballroom

Madelyn Reyes, D.N.P., M.A., M.P.A., RN, HRSA; Aleisha Langhorne, M.Div., M.P.H., M.H.S.A., HRSA/Bureau of Health Workforce; Joe Hyde, M.A., CAS, LMHC, JBS International, Inc.; David Gross, M.P.A., St. Claire HealthCare

5:15 p.m.–5:30 p.m.

Closing Remarks

Independence Ballroom

FORHP

Day 3—Friday, March 6, 2020

9:00 a.m.–10:45 a.m.

Learning Collaborative/Breakout Sessions


RCORP–Implementation and RCORP–MAT Expansion


Rapid-Fire Sessions on Optimizing Operational and Financial Performance

Independence Ballroom – Salons D & E



Optimizing Reimbursement and Ensuring Accurate Billing and Coding

This part of the session will include an overview of the opportunities and challenges associated with reimbursement mechanisms, including coding and billing for managed care, Medicaid, and other third-party payors.

Susan Rohde, RHIT, CCS-P, Eide Bailly, LLP; Amy Tepp, B.S., CPA, Eide Bailly, LLP



Optimizing Reimbursement and Ensuring Accurate Billing and Coding

This part of the session will include an overview of the additional opportunities and challenges associated with reimbursement mechanisms, including coding and billing for managed care, Medicaid, and other third-party payors.

Laurie Daigle, B.S., Stroudwater Revenue Cycle Solutions



Identifying Financial Resources

This part of the session will present an overview of strategies that organizations can use to identify potential funding sources for the RCORP-funded addiction services/activities and to perform financial mapping.

Jeffery Hunter, M.P.H., M.B.A., CPA, CFP, CSA, J. A. Hunter & Co., LLC



Assessing Community Needs, Demand for Services, and Organizational Capacity

This part of the session will present an overview of strategies that organizations can use to assess the demand for the services/activities that the agency provides and to ensure the agency has the capacity to continue to provide those services/activities after the conclusion of the RCORP grant award.

Natalie Slaughter, M.S., B.S., JBS International, Inc.; Jaslean LaTaillade, Ph.D., JBS International, Inc.



Optimizing Operational Performance

This session will include an overview of how providers not only can comply but actually can be successful with the unique clinical and administrative requirements imposed on them by managed care organizations (MCOs) and other third-party payors. This session will highlight the changes in process and infrastructure that have proven necessary for service providers.

Joe Hyde, M.A., CAS, LMHC, JBS International, Inc.


RCORP–Planning II and RHOP Sessions


Grant Writing and Sustaining Your Consortium (Group 1)

Independence Ballroom – Salons A–C

This dynamic grant writing session will look at particular principles and approaches that have broad application and demonstrated success when applying for funding. It will look particularly at how to sustain a consortium through creating a shared vision, maintaining relationships, and ensuring financial support.

Pam Baston, M.P.A., B.S.W., CPP, JBS International, Inc.


Quality Improvement and Strategic Partnerships (Group 2)

Independence Ballroom – Salons F–H

Participants will receive a refresher on QI and how to apply specific exercises to ensure grant activities are meeting intended goals. The session will also discuss strategic partnerships.

Angela Carman, Dr.P.H., University of Kentucky; Kari Earle, M.Ed., B.S., JBS International, Inc.


RCORP–Implementation and RCORP–MAT Expansion (Preselected Participants)


Systems Mapping Workshop (Participants have been preselected for this workshop)

Treasury Room

This interactive workshop will create a deeper understanding of systems thinking and the application of systems mapping to address the opioid epidemic. The workshop is a prerequisite to the Opioid Systems Mapping Learning Collaborative; however, attendance is not a commitment to the Learning Collaborative. Workshop participants will:

  • Learn systems mapping facilitation approaches

  • Practice systems mapping of opioid challenges

  • Build systems thinking skills around opioid challenges

  • Consider further participation in the learning community.

Amanda Phillips Martinez, M.P.H., Georgia Health Policy Center; Jane Branscomb, M.P.H., Georgia Health Policy Center; Leigh Alderman, J.D., M.P.H.; Georgia Health Policy Center, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University; Coleman Tanner; M.P.H., Georgia Health Policy Center

10:45 a.m.–11:15 a.m.

Break

11:15 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Learning Collaborative/Breakout Sessions


RCORP–Implementation and RCORP–MAT Expansion


Optimizing Reimbursement, Ensuring Accurate Billing and Coding, and Identifying Financial Resources Learning Collaborative

Independence Ballroom – Salons D & E

This session will provide participants with a broader overview of the opportunities and challenges associated with reimbursement mechanisms, including coding and billing for managed care, Medicaid, and other third-party payors. The session will also present more detailed strategies that organizations can use to identify potential funding sources for the RCORP-funded addiction services/activities and to perform financial mapping.

Susan Rohde, RHIT, CCS-P, Eide Bailly, LLP; Amy Tepp, B.S., CPA, Eide Bailly, LLP; Laurie Daigle, B.S., Stroudwater Revenue Cycle Solutions; Jeffery Hunter, M.P.H., M.B.A., CPA, CFP, CSA, J. A. Hunter & Co., LLC



Assessing Community Needs, Demand for Services, and Organizational Capacity Learning Collaborative

Monument Room

This session will present strategies that organizations can use to assess the demand for the services/activities that the agency provides and to ensure the agency has the capacity to continue to provide those services/activities after the conclusion of the RCORP grant award.

Robert Lyle Cooper, Ph.D., Meharry Medical College Department of Family and Community Medicine; Natalie Slaughter, M.S., B.S, JBS International, Inc.; Jaslean LaTaillade, Ph.D., JBS International, Inc.


Optimizing Operational Performance Learning Collaborative

Supreme Court Room

Building off the morning’s session, this learning collaborative will dig deeper into the changes in program operations and infrastructure that have proven necessary for service providers to flourish in this environment. The two subsequent follow-up sessions will dive deeper into key knowledge, skills, and practices specific to work with MCOs. Based on participant needs and interest, topics may include becoming an MCO provider, prior authorizations and reauthorizations for care, and back-office systems needed to manage this payer process.

Joe Hyde M.A., CAS, LMHC, JBS International, Inc.


RCORP–Planning II and RHOP Sessions


Grant Writing and Sustaining Your Consortium (Group 2)

Independence Ballroom – Salons A–C

This dynamic grant writing session will look at particular principles and approaches that have broad application and demonstrated success when applying for funding. It will also look particularly at how to sustain a consortium through creating a shared vision, maintaining relationships, and ensuring financial support.

Pam Baston, M.P.A., B.S.W., CPP, JBS International, Inc.



Quality Improvement and Strategic Partnerships (Group 1)

Independence Ballroom – Salons F–H

Participants will receive a refresher on QI and how to apply specific exercises to ensure grant activities are meeting our intended goals. The session will also discuss strategic partnerships.

Angela Carman, Dr.P.H., University of Kentucky; Kari Earle, M.Ed., B.S., JBS International, Inc.


RCORP–Implementation and RCORP–MAT Expansion (Preselected Participants)


Systems Mapping Workshop (Participants have been preselected for this workshop)

Treasury Room

This is the second part of the “Systems Mapping Workshop” that began at 9:00 a.m. and includes the same group during both halves.

1:00 p.m.

Sessions Conclude